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Rest: How Christians Can Avoid Quitting Addiction Recovery Treatment

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“I’m tired,” “This [addiction recovery] is so hard,” or “I give up.” As a person struggling with alcohol or drug addiction, have you ever said these words?  Quitting your substance abuse treatment can seem like a good idea. Everyone needs a break or rest during a difficult time. So is the faith-based treatment program offered by Home of Grace really necessary to achieve sobriety? Let’s see how God defines rest.

Statistics for Quitting a Substance Abuse Treatment Program

In the U.S., there are more than 14,500 addiction treatment centers. “In 2017, of the more than 18 million people who needed but did not receive treatment for substance abuse, only 1 million, or 5.7 percent, of those people felt they needed treatment,” according to American Addiction Centers.

Furthermore, The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports 40 to 60 percent of people relapse. This figure coincides with users who actually quit treatment permanently.

Reasons for Quitting Rehab

The Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs published “Reasons for Quitting Among Emerging Adults and Adolescents in Substance-Use-Disorder Treatment.” The article said, “They identified four factors, which were labeled health concerns…self-control…social influence…and legal…”

In other words, some people stop treatment because of health reasons. Secondly, other people want to prove to their family and friends that they can stop using if they want to (self-control).  Thirdly, social influence or avoiding disapproval from others was cited as another reason. Finally, some people leave treatment because of legal problems.

Regardless of the circumstances, Christians should strive to put God first. So the real question should be is your decision pleasing to God? Isaiah 55:8 – 9 (New International Version) – “For my thoughts are not your thoughts neither are your ways my ways,” declares the LORD. Also, there is a way that appears to be right; but in the end it leads to death (Proverbs 14:12).

Quitting, Resting, and Relapsing

Quitting is a deliberate decision to stop trying.

Resting in the carnal sense means taking a short break from mental or physical exhaustion.  Genesis 2:2-3 – By the seventh day God had finished. The work he had been doing; so on the seventh day he rested from all his work. Doing the work required to finish drug or alcohol abuse treatment requires 100 percent effort of your mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual abilities.

Resting refuels your energy so you can continue to avoid using drugs or alcohol. “Those that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength.”– Isaiah 40:31.

Relapse is a regression. Addiction is a chronic illness. Relapse is highly probable. The National Institute on Drug Abuse said, “Treatment enables people to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects on the brain and behavior and to regain control of their lives.”

However, relapse is not failure. Instead, it is an indication that treatment needs to be reinstated or modified. Strive to understand the disease of addiction.

Rely on God on the Path of Recovery

The term “rest” is used more than 30 times in the Bible. However, there are different meanings.

In Hebrew, “nuach” means to rest or be quiet.

It is similar to “Shabbat” or a Hebrew word for Sabbath, a day of rest and renewal.

In Greek, “anapausis” means cessation, refreshment. It can also mean a lack of faith, distrust. In Hebrews 4:2 – Some had heard the good news of Christ but rejected it for lack of faith.

What Does Rest Look Like in Addiction Recovery?

Our strength comes from resting in the Lord. Isaiah 30:15 – “For thus says the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel: In returning and Rest you shall be saved; in quietness and confidence shall be your strength.” Rest includes the following.

  1. Sleep
    Matthew 8:24 – Suddenly a furious storm came up on the lake, so that the waves swept over the boat. But Jesus was sleeping. Notice that Jesus was not concerned about his circumstances. He had peace despite the chaos surrounding him.
  2. Be Obedient
    Jeremiah 6:16-17 – “Thus says the Lord: Stand in the ways and see and ask for the old paths, where the good way is and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls. However, they refused to listen and did not receive rest.
  3. Ask God for Help
    Matthew 11:28 – 30 – “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. …For my yoke is easy and my burden is light. Enter God’s presence. Make prayer a habit.
  4. Seek Solitude
    Matthew 14:13 – When Jesus heard about [the beheading of John the Baptist] what had happened, he withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place…In our busy society, all of us are tempted by people, places, and things. Before you entered substance abuse and recovery treatment, you were influenced by the crowd. Now you know you need to disengage from the cares of the world and engage with the Creator.
  5. Wait
    Psalm 37:7 – “Rest in the Lord I wait patiently for him.” Does it seem like things are not happening fast enough? Is your non-addicted partner failing to keep up with your pace? Stop, relax your mind, and wait.

Stay focused on God’s word during your journey to substance abuse recovery. Let God renew your strength. Then you will mount up like eagles and run and not be weary.

If you are struggling with alcohol or drug abuse, contact Home of Grace today at 228-826-5283.

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